Sorghum: A Gluten-Free Whole Grain

White sorghum

Sorghum: A Gluten-Free Whole Grain

Sorghum is recognized as an important farm crop in the United States and has expanded to become one of the top five crops grown worldwide.

Although sorghum has been predominately grown for livestock feed and ethanol production in the United States, it is mainly used for human food elsewhere in the world. This is partly because the crop can grow in harsh environments with drought conditions where other grains do not typically perform as well.

Council History: Decades of Opening Doors

Since its founding in 1960, the U.S. Grains Council (USGC) has held fast to its commitment to develop new markets for U.S. coarse grains and co-products – sometimes even in seemingly unlikely places.

It was an early step in the long process of re-opening U.S.-Cuba relations when the Council led a humanitarian grain donation to Cuba.

The Cuba mission in 1998 required State Department authorization, and the USGC delegation had to travel by way of Mexico because flights were not available from the United States to the island nation.

Quality Matters As U.S. Sorghum Harvest Makes Strides Forward

With sorghum harvest well underway, farmers are taking steps to ensure quality for customers here at home and around the world.

Already 61 percent of U.S. sorghum has been harvested with more than 90 percent of the crop rated as mature in the 11 states that planted 98 percent of the 2014 sorghum acreage, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA's) crop progress report issued on Oct. 19.

Harvesting and maintaining this high-quality crop will be important this year as U.S. sorghum buyers around the globe continue to demand a high-quality product.

Audio: Quality Matters As U.S. Sorghum Harvest Gets Underway

With sorghum harvest well underway, farmers are taking steps to ensure quality for customers here at home and around the world.

More than three-quarters of U.S. sorghum is mature with 65 percent of the crop rated as good or better in the 11 states that planted 98 percent of the 2014 sorghum acreage, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) crop progress report issued on Oct. 4.

Harvesting and maintaining this high-quality crop will be important this year as U.S. sorghum buyers around the globe continue to demand a high-quality product.

USGC Promotes U.S. Coarse Grains to Chinese Dairy Managers

By: Wennie Liu, U.S. Grains Council Dairy Program Manager in China

The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) hosted a team of Chinese dairy managers in the United States this week to learn firsthand about modern U.S. dairy practices from U.S. producers.

The visit included stops at large-scale U.S. dairy operations in California, the World Dairy Expo and the University of Wisconsin for a short course on modern dairy production practices. The team also visited ethanol plants, where U.S. distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are produced, and U.S. corn farms in Wisconsin.

U.S. Grain Farmers Give Crop Updates

The U.S. Grains Council’s Grain News has followed three producers throughout 2015: Greg Alber, a corn farmer from Iowa; Adam Baldwin, a sorghum farmer from Kansas; and Mark Seastrand, a barley farmer from North Dakota. Each have shared their decision-making processes on their farms for planting, managing the growing season and now harvest.

As harvest approaches and these producers start to take the 2015 crop from the fields, they are keeping their eyes on the ever-changing market outlook, as well as evaluating their inputs for the current year and planning for 2016.

Audio: USGC Manager of Global Trade Discusses Recent Trip To China

U.S. Grains Council (USGC) Manager of Global Trade Alvaro Cordero recently returned from a market servicing mission to China and shared with the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) some of his impressions of China’s demand for U.S. sorghum and distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS). Cordero also discussed what the Council is doing to keep grain flowing to that important market.

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